Trait std::cmp::PartialOrd1.0.0 [] [src]

pub trait PartialOrd<Rhs = Self>: PartialEq<Rhs> where Rhs: ?Sized {
    fn partial_cmp(&self, other: &Rhs) -> Option<Ordering>;

    fn lt(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool { ... }
    fn le(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool { ... }
    fn gt(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool { ... }
    fn ge(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool { ... }
}

Trait for values that can be compared for a sort-order.

The comparison must satisfy, for all a, b and c:

Note that these requirements mean that the trait itself must be implemented symmetrically and transitively: if T: PartialOrd<U> and U: PartialOrd<V> then U: PartialOrd<T> and T: PartialOrd<V>.

Derivable

This trait can be used with #[derive]. When derived, it will produce a lexicographic ordering based on the top-to-bottom declaration order of the struct's members.

How can I implement Ord?

PartialOrd only requires implementation of the partial_cmp method, with the others generated from default implementations.

However it remains possible to implement the others separately for types which do not have a total order. For example, for floating point numbers, NaN < 0 == false and NaN >= 0 == false (cf. IEEE 754-2008 section 5.11).

PartialOrd requires your type to be PartialEq.

If your type is Ord, you can implement partial_cmp() by using cmp():

use std::cmp::Ordering;

#[derive(Eq)]
struct Person {
    id: u32,
    name: String,
    height: u32,
}

impl PartialOrd for Person {
    fn partial_cmp(&self, other: &Person) -> Option<Ordering> {
        Some(self.cmp(other))
    }
}

impl Ord for Person {
    fn cmp(&self, other: &Person) -> Ordering {
        self.height.cmp(&other.height)
    }
}

impl PartialEq for Person {
    fn eq(&self, other: &Person) -> bool {
        self.height == other.height
    }
}Run

You may also find it useful to use partial_cmp() on your type's fields. Here is an example of Person types who have a floating-point height field that is the only field to be used for sorting:

use std::cmp::Ordering;

struct Person {
    id: u32,
    name: String,
    height: f64,
}

impl PartialOrd for Person {
    fn partial_cmp(&self, other: &Person) -> Option<Ordering> {
        self.height.partial_cmp(&other.height)
    }
}

impl PartialEq for Person {
    fn eq(&self, other: &Person) -> bool {
        self.height == other.height
    }
}Run

Examples

let x : u32 = 0;
let y : u32 = 1;

assert_eq!(x < y, true);
assert_eq!(x.lt(&y), true);Run

Required Methods

This method returns an ordering between self and other values if one exists.

Examples

use std::cmp::Ordering;

let result = 1.0.partial_cmp(&2.0);
assert_eq!(result, Some(Ordering::Less));

let result = 1.0.partial_cmp(&1.0);
assert_eq!(result, Some(Ordering::Equal));

let result = 2.0.partial_cmp(&1.0);
assert_eq!(result, Some(Ordering::Greater));Run

When comparison is impossible:

let result = std::f64::NAN.partial_cmp(&1.0);
assert_eq!(result, None);Run

Provided Methods

This method tests less than (for self and other) and is used by the < operator.

Examples

let result = 1.0 < 2.0;
assert_eq!(result, true);

let result = 2.0 < 1.0;
assert_eq!(result, false);Run

This method tests less than or equal to (for self and other) and is used by the <= operator.

Examples

let result = 1.0 <= 2.0;
assert_eq!(result, true);

let result = 2.0 <= 2.0;
assert_eq!(result, true);Run

This method tests greater than (for self and other) and is used by the > operator.

Examples

let result = 1.0 > 2.0;
assert_eq!(result, false);

let result = 2.0 > 2.0;
assert_eq!(result, false);Run

This method tests greater than or equal to (for self and other) and is used by the >= operator.

Examples

let result = 2.0 >= 1.0;
assert_eq!(result, true);

let result = 2.0 >= 2.0;
assert_eq!(result, true);Run

Implementors